Prince Philip's 90 year old car kept in Sri Lankan museum!

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By: Jeet Ghosh

Last Update: 2021-04-18 13:16:04 IST

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According to museum records, Prince first drove the Epicionado car from Colombo to the Naval Base in Trincomalee. The special thing is that this vehicle can still be driven. Gardiner's father Cyril brought it here in the year 1950.

Prince Philip's 90-year-old car has been preserved as a centerpiece at the Museum of Sri Lanka. This car was bought by Prince Philip in 1935 for 12 pounds. The name of this vehicle is Efficionado.

Sanjeev Gardiner, who kept this car at the Gully Face Hotel in Colombo, said that Prince Philip had come to see this car in the year 1950. Gardiner's Hotel is one of the oldest hotels in the British Colony. Along with this, he has also built a museum where silver and black colored sedans have been preserved. They are kept here to entertain guests and tourists.

According to museum records, Prince first drove the Epicionado car from Colombo to the Naval Base in Trincomalee. The special thing is that this vehicle can still be driven. Gardiner's father Cyril brought it here in the year 1950.
 
It is noteworthy that Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth II of Britain, died on 10 April. Prince Philip was very fond of vehicles and was fond of driving. In 2019, 2 people were injured due to their vehicle colliding, after which they surrendered their license.

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