England cricketers are upset with the abusive word, want to boycott the internet media

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By: Jeet Ghosh

Last Update: 2021-04-12 14:18:33 IST

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Troubled by the abuses on the internet media, England cricketers have now decided to take a stand against it. The team is thinking of boycotting the internet media. Fast bowler Stuart Broad has said this.

Troubled by the abuses on the internet media, England cricketers have now decided to take a stand against it. Team Internet Media ( Media Social ) is thinking about the boycott. Fast bowler Stuart Broad has said this. England's Jofra Archer and Moeen Ali have been victims of abuse on social media and Broad said he is ready to stand against it. He said that social media has many advantages, but if we had to leave it for some time to take a stand, then they are ready for it.

Stuart Broad further said that any decision will be taken by the current leadership in the dressing room. If the team feels that there is a need for change, then a lot of big people are present on us, who will be completely clear about the thinking of the team. This will be a really big message. Let us know that recently Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasreen gave a controversial statement about England player Moeen Ali. She had said that if Moeen Ali did not play cricket, then he would have joined ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria).

Jofra Archer gave a befitting reply. He said, "You are fine, are you not? I don't think you're alright." To this, the Bangladeshi writer wrote, "The haters know very well that my tweet about Moeen was sarcastic, but people made it a point to insult me, because I try to secularize Muslim society." To this Archer wrote, ''Sarcastic? Nobody is laughing, not you yourself, at least you delete this tweet.''

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